Friday, August 30, 2013

Julia Child / Corn Timbale

One of my favorite people in the cooking industry is Julia Child. She was definitely the pioneer in the launch of the television Chef! I could write a novel about how she has influenced my interest in being in the kitchen, cooking, creating recipes and the list goes on. She taught me to "Enjoy, Peace in the Kitchen".
I started baking Julia's Corn Timbale for Thanksgiving in 1978 when I purchased her book, Julia Child & Company. I've made it every year since! It will grace our Thanksgiving table this year.
I had the pleasure of meeting her and the pleasure of having her sign my book. The other surprise was  that her husband Paul was with her and he also signed the book. You can tell by the greasy cover that I have used this book many, many times.
In 1989 I had the opportunity to see her again. It was at a book signing and the rules stated that she would only sign a book that was purchased the day of the event. This is not an uncommon practice when celebrity Chefs have a personal appearance that includes a book signing.
I decided that I would be the rebel and take my copy of Julia & Company that was well worn and 11 years old, and I would see if she would sign it again...... as I approached the table..... she was sharing the table with Jacques Pepin and I knew that there were time restraints and the line was being rushed past them as they quickly autographed their new book.
I stopped in front of Julia, pulled out my very old and worn out copy of the book and laid it down in front of her with the page opened to where she and Paul had both signed it in 1978. I could tell she was interested in the story because she had already lost Paul and it was a memory for her to see their autographs on the book. She talked to me about the time that they were together that day in 1978 and she commented on my interest in the Timbale recipe.
She took her pen and very cleverly signed the book...... Julia, again! 10/10/89
I thought that was brilliant. I thanked her and expressed to her that I will continue to make Corn Timbale for Thanksgiving.

Thanks you Julia and Paul for allowing me to have the pleasure of meeting you both and to share this story on my blog 35 years later.




Corn Timbale

3 C fresh or frozen corn (process the corn in a Food Processor and then measure 3C. Pulse it just to cream it slightly)
6 eggs
3 TBS grated onion (I use a box grater)
1 tsp salt
5 TBS fresh chopped parsley
2/3 C bread crumbs
2/3 C grated Swiss Cheese
2/3 C heavy cream
6 drops Tabasco Sauce or 1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper

In a large bowl:
Beat eggs
Add all remaining ingredients.
Mix well
This step can be done ahead of time and refrigerated until ready to bake.
Cover and refrigerate if baking later.

preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
Butter a Charlotte Mold and cut a piece of waxed paper for the bottom and butter that too.
Stir the mixture again.
Pour into the pan.
Set the Charlotte Mold in a Roasting Pan and fill with boiling water.
Bake at 350 for 30 minutes.
Reduce heat to 325 and continue to bake for 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours more.
As it bakes, the Timbale will rise and the top will crack.
Allow to rest in the pan on a cooling rack for at least 10 minutes.
Un mold onto a plate  (remember to remove the waxed paper from the bottom of the Timbale, I've forgotten it so many times that I've written a reminder on the recipe)  and then reverse it again onto a serving platter right side up.

Enjoy!
Peace in the Kitchen!

When I got the recipe in 1978, I bought the Charlotte Mold
and the Roasting Pan for the Timbale.
It's the only thing I've used these pans for since then.
The Charlotte pan has a permanent line marking
the level of the water for the Bain Marie method of baking.

















This is the cover of the cook book. I would say that it's been used a lot!
This is one of my favorite cook books!
I just took a Timbale out of the oven to serve for Thanksgiving 2015. This is one of my favorite side dishes. It turned out really well this year. It's really beautiful. There's something to be said for Julia Child and everything she taught us about cooking.




Enjoy!
Peace in the Kitchen!

3 comments:

  1. I too love Julia and this book, mine now with many loose pages. In addition to wonderful classic recipes, it is full of techniques. I have never tried rolling a boned chicken but feel with this book in hand, I could do it. I have a memory of making Indian Pudding for Thanksgiving one year that makes me smile. It is very traditional and not at all adapted to the modern palate. I liked it but my family's reaction was...hmm, polite. The New England baked beans are delicious. I have also converted many a brussel sprout hater with Julia's recipe for blanching to barely done.
    Thanks for posting this. My book is still packed from a move and my daughter in law requested Timbale of Corn with brussel sprouts as my contribution to Thanksgiving.

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    Replies
    1. I'm so glad that the recipe sparked a memory for you. She is one of my favorite people!

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  2. Thank you for the recipe. I had forgotten how well I had liked a corn timbale.
    Earlier this year while on holiday in Italy we were served individual corn timbales with a Gorgonzola sauce. Oh, what a delight! Now I do believe I'll try making the individual servings for our next dinner party.
    Julia Child really was brilliant, wasn't she?

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